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#1 2014-05-21 14:37:12

dougmc
Administrator
Registered: 2008-06-01
Posts: 582

Ride of Silence Wednesday 5/21 (today), Pfluger Ped Bridge, 6:30pm

https://www.facebook.com/events/1436376286617307/

Sorry for the late notice, didn't realize that this hadn't been posted yet.

On the evening of Wednesday, May 21, cyclists all over the world will ride in honor and in memory of fellow cyclists who have been injured or killed while cycling on public roadways.

In Austin, we will start an eight-mile ride originating and ending on the James D. Pfluger Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge. This ride will last approximately one hour. Please gather at 6:30 PM. Ride starts at 7pm sharp.

If you choose to participate in the ride, please follow the following guidelines:

1. Treat the pre-ride gathering and the ride with respect to the intention of the ride—to honor/grieve/remember fallen and injured cyclists.
2. Put safety first. Normally, helmets are suggested for adults and required for cyclists under 18 years of age. However, we ask that all participate as if helmets are required.
3. Maintain silence during the ride, using only hand signals to relay ride support or caution.
4. Ride no faster than 12 mph. There will be pace setters leading the group and others spread throughout. Ride of Silence was organized to simulate a funeral procession; therefore, ride slowly.
5. Comply with local, state and federal laws of the public roadways, keeping the following in mind:
a. Obey all stop signs and traffic signals.
b. Stay in the bike lane or ride as far to the right of the lane as practicable.
c. Ride a bike that has working brakes and the required lights and reflectors.
d. Ride no more than two abreast, or if that impedes traffic, ride single-file. Cyclists have the right to occupy a lane and be treated as any other wheeled vehicle on the road. Even though this is like a funeral procession, we can still be polite to other vehicles.

During the dedication period of the ride, you may speak about any rider that you wish to be named or that you are riding in honor of. If you wish to speak, please arrive prior to 6:30pm and locate one of the ride organizers.

Some riders will wear black armbands in memory of riders killed, a red armband for a cyclist who has been injured sharing the road, or will pin pictures to their jerseys. All of these gestures are beautiful tributes, promote awareness, and provide an opportunity for silent reflection.

The ride map can be viewed on Bikely.com at http://www.bikely.com/maps/bike-path/20 … stin-Texas

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#2 2014-05-22 00:20:57

MichaelBluejay
Webmaster
From: Austin, TX
Registered: 2008-05-26
Posts: 1,316
Website

Re: Ride of Silence Wednesday 5/21 (today), Pfluger Ped Bridge, 6:30pm

Here's the KVUE article on the event:  http://www.kvue.com/news/editors-pick/R … picks=true

I have to strongly object to this:

. Put safety first. Normally, helmets are suggested for adults and required for cyclists under 18 years of age. However, we ask that all participate as if helmets are required.

...for numerous reasons.  Here are some:

First, helmets haven't been shown to have an overall safety effect, since while they help in some ways, they hurt in others (drivers passing helmeted cyclists closer, helmeted cyclists more likely to have their helmeted head strike the ground because their head is bigger).

Second, the focus on helmets continues to make people think that helmets are the first and last word in bike safety, when in fact, they pale in comparison to safe-riding skills, roadways designed with cyclists in mind, driver education, etc.

Finally, the focus on helmets encourages society to consider unhelmeted cyclists as stupid (when statistically they're not at any greater risk), and to blame such "stupid" cyclists when they get hit by at-fault drivers.

Let's remember, when cyclist Ben Clough was killed, the Statesman was quick to point out that he hadn't been wearing a helmet.  They didn't even mention the fact that the driver ran a red light to hit him.

And, that driver paid no fine, did no jail time, and didn't even get a ticket for running the red light.  How could that be?  Well, the cyclist was stupid for not "putting safety first", wasn't he?

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